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Archive for the ‘restoration’ Category

REFORM stands for REstoring river FOR effective catchment Management. It’s a pretty cool effort and I’d recommend spending some time noodling around the site. www.reformrivers.eu

The publication ‘Final report on methods, models, tools to assess the hydromorphology of rivers’ can be viewed as a pdf here. It’s a little over 100 pages, but it’s worth the read as it focuses on monitoring standards and assessment procedures to characterize the consequences of river degradation and restoration.  The report contains the following chapters:

  1. Introduction
  2. Overall Methodological Framework
  3. Stage I: Catchment-wide delineation and spatial characterization of the fluvial system
  4. Stage II: Assessment of temporal changes and current conditions
  5. Stage III: Assessment of scenario-based future trends
  6. Stage IV: River management

The report is chock full of good information, useful graphics, and literature. I particularly enjoyed this summary table in chapter 6.

hydromorphological_restoration

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Dr. Andrew Simon pulls together an excellent set of ideas in this presentation:

http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/glp/events/summer2008/week1/full/16-ResponseAndRestorationImplications.pdf

For several years, I’ve struggled with the idea of a reference stream. He lays out some of the problems with the approach.  I like how he introduces the idea of a hydrologic floodplain and a topographic floodplain.  I also like how he highlights the notion that “bankfull” discharge applies to a stable channel.

One of the best questions he asks is: “How does the channel respond?” Answer: “It depends”  The figure below was pulled from Janet Hooke’s 2003 Geomorphology article titled “Coarse sediment connectivity in river channel systems: a conceptual framework methodology”  I think the image does a good job of supporting Dr. Simons’ question about how a channel would respond. Clearly the spatial variability that all rivers have dictate that a thorough inspection of a site and its context within a watershed is warranted.

erosion_deposition_spatial_variability

I also always like a presentation that goes back and explicitly states first principals in geomorphology:

Applied (Driving) Forces vs. Resisting Forces.

I was first exposed to this idea as an undergraduate at Middlebury College in the early 1990’s thanks to my advisor Jack Schmidt and it is still true as it ever was today.

I like the way Mr. Simon thinks and presents his ideas. Keeping these ideas in mind the next time a restoration project comes along would be excellent, especially at the early stages so that that all parties can better understand the river adjustment dynamics at a project site.

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The Kentucky Institute for the Environment and Sustainable Development publishes Sustain – a journal of environmental and sustainability issues.  The Spring/Summer 2011 issue has six articles covering stream restoration. The articles cover groundwater and surface water connections, floodplain restoration, urban stream restoration, artificial ponds and a case study.

The full issue is available here:

http://louisville.edu/kiesd/sustain-magazine/Sustain24.pdf

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The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife has just released a draft of its document titled “Stream Habitat Restoration Guidelines 2012” here.  It’s an  831 page document that I’ve only skimmed so far.  It does look rather thorough and as with many other documents covering the subject in general, it advocates for a watershed analysis and perspective on impacts throughout the landscape that can have an effect on physical channel habitat.  The document has 5 chapters covering some broad restoration themes, it then goes into 13 specific restoration techniques ranging from floodplain and channel manipulation, to large woody debris management and beaver management.  Finally, the document provides 10 appendices which appear to be introductions to academic courses such as fluvial geomorphology, sediment transport and hydrology.  Overall, it looks like an excellent reference to add to one’s  library on the topic of stream restoration.

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I just received this email and as a Utah State alum, I thought it was worth posting:

—————————————————————————————————

August 6-10, 2012
Intermountain Center for River Rehabilitation & Restoration
Utah State University
Logan, Utah

For more information and registration: http://cnr.usu.edu/icrrr/

This course is for those who wish to understand and apply the principles of sediment transport to alluvial channel assessment and design.  Principles of open channel flow and sediment transport are combined with watershed hydrologic and sediment source analysis to place channel assessment and design in the appropriate context. The course balances advance reading, lecture, field work, and hands-on exercises for estimating sediment supply, calculating sediment transport rates, forecasting channel response to water and sediment supply, and a class project incorporating gravel augmentation into channel design for dynamic fish habitat.  This course is intended for participants who are familiar with basic principles of river geomorphology.

Topics include:

  • Spatial analysis tools for estimating sediment supply at the watershed to reach level
  • Threshold and alluvial channel models, with guidelines for assessment and design incorporating uncertainty
  • Sediment transport calculations: challenges and methods, sediment rating curves, cumulative transport
  • Field measurement of sediment transport and guidance for different sampling approaches
  • 1-d flow and transport models: HEC-RAS applied to flow competence and sediment transport capacity
  • Forward and inverse application of mixed-size surface-based transport models

Principal Instructors

Peter Wilcock (course director), Professor, Geography and Environmental Engineering,
Johns Hopkins University

Tyler Allred, Principal, Allred Restoration

Patrick Belmont, Professor, Watershed Science, Utah State University

Susannah Erwin, Postdoctoral Associate, Watershed Science, Utah State University

Milada Majerova, Postdoctoral Associate, Watershed Science, Utah State University

The course is taught among the majestic peaks of the Wasatch and Bear River mountains near Logan UT. Cache Valley is a delightful place to visit in August.  Salt Lake City is easy to fly into and there are abundant opportunities for outdoor adventure before & after the course.

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This is not exactly hot off the press, but there is a wealth of good information here.  The state of Montana held a training back in December, 2009 and has posted what looks like essentially all the training material that David Williams developed for the course.

http://www.dnrc.mt.gov/wrd/water_op/floodplain/streambank_course/default.asp

Be sure to scroll through the whole list of resources and check out the spreadsheets on the bottom of the page.

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David Williams has put together and shared a nice set of slides that covers engineered log jams (ELJs).  Not too surprisingly, the work comes from the West Coast.  While I don’t disagree with the cons necessarily, they really are site specific.  For a forested environment with a history of wood removal and clearing from the channel and with roads that aren’t terribly close to the river, I don’t think the cons are really all that bad.  In a wood depauperate environment, the local scour, deposition and increased flow complexity generally is a benefit to most fish species as these areas can provide some refugia.   Once infrastructure, namely roads, crossings, homes and businesses start to enter the picture, then by all means, the cons are completely legitimate.

In any event, Mr. Williams has put together a nice package of information and well worth your time to read if you are contemplating adding some engineered log jams to a channel.

HT: David Williams in the Stream Restoration Professionals LinkedIn group.

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