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Archive for November, 2011

Here’s a nice video of a NOAA Restoration Center funded project in Maine.

Montsweag Brook Restoration Project – YouTube.

What a great opportunity for the kids to see the dam removed and to see how the channel and valley will change over time.

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The subcommittee on sedimentation is in the early stages of creating a database of geomorphic observations.  It’s an attempt at getting data such as field notes, field maps, pebble counts, cross sections and longitudinal profile data into one searchable database. Clearly, it’s not an easy task.  There is an existing effort that has been established through the Vigil Network that the group intends to build upon.  I’ve plotted the location of these sites using ArcGIS.com.

http://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/embedViewer.html?webmap=433e7552cbde4968abbc615bc79803b9
View Larger Map

For fluvial geomorphologists, this is an exiting effort.  I wish the group the best of luck!

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Many of you are likely familiar with the real time data the USGS serves with respect to flow and perhaps stage. While the network is far more limited, the USGS also serves up real-time water quality data that are available here:
http://waterwatch.usgs.gov/wqwatch/
Perhaps there is a project you are working on that might be able to put these data to use.  The water quality variables include temperature, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and nitrate levels (very few sites).

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The NSF just created a nice presentation highlighting some of Frank Magilligan’s monitoring work that has pre and post dam removal data on the Ashuelot River in New Hampshire.

http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/removingdams.jsp

It seems as though the bathymetric data will be the main data source for telling the story on how and where the channel has adjusted post dam removal.  I assume the LIDAR data will be used to generate overbank elevation data in a hydraulic model.   In any event, it looks like a fun and interesting project. Keep up the good work Frank!

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